Potatoes ruined by late blight disease (left) are compared to healthy potatoes.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Conventional cowpea is offered for sale in a Nigerian market. The genetically engineered variety is still under development.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Akhter Hossain of Bangladesh compares healthy potatoes (right) to potatoes infected with late blight fungus.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Close up of potato infected by late blight fungus.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A trader prepares to package conventional cowpea for a customer in a Nigerian market. An insect resistant variety is now under development.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Maturing cabbage plants in Geneva, NY, are ready for the release of genetically engineered sterile diamondback moths in a 2017 field trial.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A cowpea trader waits for customers at a market in Nigeria, which is conducted field trials on a genetically engineered, insect resistant variety.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Leaf wilting is a symptom of infection by the cassava mosaic virus, as displayed in this crop in Tanzania.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A trader bags conventional cowpea for a customer to buy at a Nigerian market. The insect-resistant cowpea variety is under development.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science

Download
Though tiny, diamond back moths wreak considerable farm damage, prompting efforts to use biotechnology, instead of insecticides, to control this pest.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
These cages contain genetically engineered sterile diamondback moths that are part of a contained field trial in Geneva, NY.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Entomologist Dr. Anthony Shelton releases genetically engineered sterile diamondback moths into cages for a contained field trial in Geneva, NY.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Cornell University entomologist Dr. Anthony Shelton releases genetically engineered sterile diamondback male moths into cages for a contained trial in Geneva, NY.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A field of cabbage planted in Geneva, NY, in preparation for Cornell University's 2017 field trials of the genetically engineered sterile diamondback moth.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
An ear of drought tolerant maize thrives in Tanzania's first confined field trial of a genetically engineered crop, which used the WEMA seeds.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Dr. Charles Mugoya (right), chairman of Uganda's National Biotechnology Council, and Dr. Eric Magembe, a molecular biologist at the Crop Improvement Project, observe a late 2017 confined field trial for late blight disease resistant potatoes.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Local farmers participate in planting late blight resistant potatoes at a confined field trial at Rwebitaba in Fortportal, Uganda.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
After losing two maize crops to drought, Said Salum Njukwage, a farmer in the Bagamoyo region of Tanzania, is looking forward to growing WEMA maize.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A Tanzanian farmer displays cassava infected with the black streak disease. Scientists are developing a genetically engineered variety resistant to the disease.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Mariam Ditopile Mzuzuri examines corn at an Iowa farm during an Alliance for Science global farmer communications training program in Moline, IL.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Check out our full collection of science and farmer videos on YouTube.  If you’re interested in raw video footage or other photographs, please contact jc2436@cornell.edu.