Bt brinjal farmer Hafizur Rahman shows the damage caused by fruit and shoot borer infestation of non-GMO brinjal on his farm in the Tangail district of Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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A genetically engineered, disease-resistant, Hawaii-grown papaya is ready for eating.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Genetically engineered Bt brinjal is ready for harvest in the Tangail District of Bangladesh.
Photo: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Farmer Khalilur Rahman harvests genetically engineered Bt brinjal in the Tangail district od Bangladesh .
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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A banana plant genetically engineered to fight banana bacterial wilt is off to a healthy start.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Michael Kamiya harvests genetically engineered disease-resistant papayas on his family's farm on Oahu, Hawaii.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Comparison of cassava leaves, the one on the left is a healthy plant while the one on the right shows signs of cassava mosaic virus.
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Genetically engineered Bt brinjal (eggplant) grows at a seed production site in Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Spotigy, the transgenic hornless cow, was created to avoid the practice of dehorning in the cattle industry. Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science

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Seed collected from genetically engineered, insect resistant Bt brinjal will be shared with farmers in Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Genetically engineered ringspot resistant papaya are ready for harvest on Ken Kamiya's Oahu, Hawaii, farm.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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A Uganda banana crop show serious damage from banana bacterial wilt, a disease that scientists hope to control through genetically engineered resistant varieties.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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A cassava plant in Uganda shows signs of being infected with the cassava mosaic virus.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Genetically engineered Bt brinjal (BARI variety 2) are left to ripen for seed harvest at a Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (C=BARI) regional research station in Patna, Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Bt brinjal farmer Khalilur Rahman from Tangail District, with his harvested BARI Bt brinjal 2 variety.
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A worker harvests genetically engineered, disease-resistant papaya on a family farm in Hawaii.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Alberto Belmes, who farms in the Puna District of Hawaii, was one of the first to adopt the genetically engineered papaya after the ringspot virus destroyed his crop.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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A close up of a genetically engineered ringspot-resistant papaya growing in Hawaii.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Ken Kamiya proudly displays genetically engineered ringspot resistant papaya, which he grows on his Oahu, Hawaii, farm.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
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Check out our full collection of science and farmer videos on YouTube.  If you’re interested in raw video footage or other photographs, please contact jc2436@cornell.edu.