Bt brinjal farmer Hafizur Rahman shows the damage caused by fruit and shoot borer infestation of non-GMO brinjal on his farm in the Tangail district of Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Potatoes ruined by late blight disease (left) are compared to healthy potatoes.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A genetically engineered, disease-resistant, Hawaii-grown papaya is ready for eating.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Genetically engineered Bt brinjal is ready for harvest in the Tangail District of Bangladesh.
Photo: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Farmer Khalilur Rahman harvests genetically engineered Bt brinjal in the Tangail district od Bangladesh .
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Afzal Hossain, a farmer in the Rangpur district in Bangladesh, proudly displays his harvest of genetically engineered Bt brinjal.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Akhter Hossain of Bangladesh compares healthy potatoes (right) to potatoes infected with late blight fungus.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Close up of potato infected by late blight fungus.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A banana plant genetically engineered to fight banana bacterial wilt is off to a healthy start.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Michael Kamiya harvests genetically engineered disease-resistant papayas on his family's farm on Oahu, Hawaii.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Genetically engineered Bt brinjal (eggplant) grows at a seed production site in Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Seed collected from genetically engineered, insect resistant Bt brinjal will be shared with farmers in Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A Uganda banana crop show serious damage from banana bacterial wilt, a disease that scientists hope to control through genetically engineered resistant varieties.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Spotigy, the transgenic hornless cow, was created to avoid the practice of dehorning in the cattle industry. Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science

AFS_20150526_Iowa_259
Download
Comparison of cassava leaves, the one on the left is a healthy plant while the one on the right shows signs of cassava mosaic virus.
Download
Genetically engineered Bt brinjal (BARI variety 2) are left to ripen for seed harvest at a Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (C=BARI) regional research station in Patna, Bangladesh.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Spotigy, a transgenic dairy calf developed by Recombinetics, was born without the gene for horns. Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science

AFS_20150526_Iowa_171R
Download
Leaf wilting is a symptom of infection by the cassava mosaic virus, as displayed in this crop in Tanzania.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A cassava plant in Uganda shows signs of being infected with the cassava mosaic virus.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
A worker harvests genetically engineered, disease-resistant papaya on a family farm in Hawaii.
Credit: Cornell Alliance for Science
Download
Check out our full collection of science and farmer videos on YouTube.  If you’re interested in raw video footage or other photographs, please contact jc2436@cornell.edu.